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Welcome to the Rhetorical Appeal Group 2 Pathos WikiEdit

What the heck is Pathos?Edit

Pathos is a literary device that incorporates the use of emotions in order to "sway" or convince people or a group of people by use of emotions, such as anger and fear, as well as other positive emotions and other psychological aspects. It is part of rhetorical appeal, which is the use of different types of persuasion depending on who their target audience is. It includes ethos, pathos, and logos. Examples of pathos include photos, humor, and direct quotations from someone to stir a crowd.   

Pathos can be applied to a text by including personal stories or experiences of someone. We can evaluate pathos by looking at the types of arguments a writer makes. If a writer does not use statistics and uses methods to evoke an emotional response, the author is using pathos. Pathos is able to make a dull topic come to life. This is important because even if something is not true, a writer who utilizes pathos successfully is able to convince the reader by making the feel empathetic towards the subject.

By applying pathos to a text, we are adding details and facts to make the writing feel more alive and relatable to the readers. An example is if you are a writer and you are writing a paper about loosing a loved one and how to cope with it afterwards. Attaching quotes from say a famous person, a moive or a link to an interview with someone about that topic makes your writing seem more realistic and gives the readers an easier way to connect and fuly grasp and feel the emotions.

Pathos in Chapter 3 of Hunger of MemoryEdit

Rodriguez strongly opposes the bilingual education in the earlier chapters since he believes that it makes it hard to develop public identity. However, in Chapter 3, Rodriguez defends his belief that Catholic Church can help bridge private and public life. In order to defend this contradiction, Rodriguez utilizes pathos by mentioning several personal experiences. Rodriguez talks about the differences in his public and private Catholic teaching. He starts off with his parent’s background, his early childhood, then his changes he experienced in high school and college. The detailed story he tells is used to build a connection with the reader. If the reader can get a glimpse of his life and why it caused him to believe what he does, it makes it more convincing. Rodriguez taps into the reader’s emotions by trying to gain empathy.

Rodriguez strongly opposes the bilingual education in the earlier chapters since he believes that it makes it hard to develop public identity. However, in Chapter 3, Rodriguez defends his belief that Catholic Church can help bridge private and public life. In order to defend this contradiction, Rodriguez utilizes pathos by mentioning several personal experiences. Rodriguez talks about the differences in his public and private Catholic teaching. He starts off with his parent’s background, his early childhood, then his changes he experienced in high school and college. The detailed story he tells is used to build a connection with the reader. If the reader can get a glimpse of his life and why it caused him to believe what he does, it makes it more convincing. Rodriguez taps into the reader’s emotions by trying to gain empathy

Pathos in Chapter 4 of Hunger of MemoryEdit

In Chapter 4 of Hunger of Memory, Rodriguez talks about the discrimination he faced because of his skin color. Rodriguez includes a lot of direct quotations to simulate the story for the readers, allowing them to feel the suffering he had endured as if it was them enduring it. Rodriguez also mentioned that he is troubled that he and his siblings look as if they all should belong in different countries, sharing skin tone similarities with only one of his siblings, that being his sister. The wording and detail when talking about the different colors of the siblings creates a sort of "fractured fraternity" feeling in the chapter, making the reader feel as though even though they are sibling by blood, the siblings ( or at least Richard) don't feel that way about themselves. This form of pathos uses family to tug at the heart strings of the reader, allowing the reader to ponder at the question of their own brotherly/ sisterly bonds. The chapter then further proceeds to spiral into the abyss that is racial profiling and racism which can also convey strong emotions for certain readers.

Our Stance on Hunger of Memory Edit

Rodriguez is able to bring up several good points in his novel, but they were rather ineffective overall. For example, in chapter one Richard clearly states his side opposing English and brings up his personal experiences to make persuade the audience and yet a bit later in the book he realizes the mistake of assaulting the English language and learns to respect it, causing some conflicting views in the story. Another example of poor wording and pathos can be found in chapter 3. Richards reasoning was that the Catholic Church can bridge public and private life, however it takes a more than a while to figure out his purpose and main idea, causing confusing conclusions, which at that point readers might as well stop reading the book. Furthermore there are some parts in the chapters where he was too vague and confusing, which might cause the readers of the story to lose interest quickly because of putting in the extra effort of trying to figure out the main "theme" of the chapter. Rodriguez was causing confusion because of going back and forth on his ideas and statments and not having a strong reasoning behind it. When you lack certain elements within your writing, readers start to loose interest and disconnect with your idea and your point. Grabbing attention to your audience is always important to make your statement known.


Richard-Rodriguez-final

Richard Rodriguez

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